University of Wisconsin–Madison

Types of Assignments

Transitioning your course to Hyflex or remote instruction allows for flexibility to adapt assignments to best fit your course format. The following information will help professors identify their course format as well as provide examples of assignment adaptations for the different formats.

What are the different course formats?

Depending on your course format, the types of assignments may change or need to be adapted. Formats of courses include:

Assignments given in the traditonal in-person course section may be adapted to the new modality of delivery (i.e. hyflex and online) so that they continue to promote a successful learning experience.

Kinds of assignments and how they can be adapted to course format

Examples of assignments are below, with ideas for adapting them to the format of your course:

Assignment Type Assignment that require in-person interactions Synchronous Assignments Asynchronous Assignments
Individual Presentations PowerPoint presentation with questions PowerPoint file or Recording PowerPoint file or Recording
Group Presentations PowerPoint presentation with questions PowerPoint file or Recording PowerPoint file or recording
Discussions Class/group discussion Breakout groups and sharing out to class Post Canvas Discussion board discussion answers
Quizzes and Exams In-person exam or having the quiz/exam available during a specific time frame The quiz/exam can be available during a specific time frame or over multiple days The quiz/exam can be available during a specific time frame or over multiple days
Readings and videos Assigned text readings and documents uploaded to Canvas Files Assigned text readings and documents uploaded to Canvas Files; Pre-recorded lectures uploaded to Kaltura Assigned text readings and documents uploaded to Canvas Files; Pre-recorded lectures uploaded to Kaltura

This is not an exhaustive list of assignment types that may be used in the course.

See Also:

“Asynchronous activities afford more flexibility and can make it easier for all students to participate. These activities may include peer-to-peer group work, recorded student presentations, quizzes, responses to written prompts and/or discussion.”
Instructional Continuity for instructors: Conducting Course Activities

Defining Modes of Instruction and Synchronicity

Modalities for Teaching Ranging from Remotely to In-Person